PdPR : It’s tough! Slow internet, difficult to focus

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Azmizan Atek, along with two orang asli children following the home-based teaching and learning (PdPR) using a mobile phone at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat in Selangor. PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021. Slow internet access poor internet access
Azmizan Atek, along with two orang asli children following the home-based teaching and learning (PdPR) using a mobile phone at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat in Selangor. PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.

By Kamariah Khalidi

HULU LANGAT – The implementation of the home-based teaching and learning (PdPR) for students nationwide is effective if the students have fast and strong internet connection, along with proper and complete telecommunication devices.

This is, however, not the case for students without such access, especially those living in rural areas.

The problem would certainly hamper their online learning development.

Orang Asli from the Temuan tribe, Siti Nur Khatijah Abdullah (second left) observing her brothers, Muhammad Jumaidi Omer Faruk, 14 (second right), Juil Omer Faruk, 13 (right) and sister, Nur Rara Caiser Omer Faruk, 9, as they are following the home-based teaching and learning (PdPR) using a mobile phone at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor. PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.
Orang Asli from the Temuan tribe, Siti Nur Khatijah Abdullah (second left) observing her brothers, Muhammad Jumaidi Omer Faruk, 14 (second right), Juil Omer Faruk, 13 (right) and sister, Nur Rara Caiser Omer Faruk, 9, as they are following the home-based teaching and learning (PdPR) using a mobile phone at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor.
PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.

Siti Nur Khatijah Abdullah, 26, from the Temuan tribe said that her three siblings have problem performing the PdPR as they need to share the mobile data from her phone, besides, having slow and weak internet access.

“It is a little tough as we only have one telephone and we need to share it among these three siblings who are from different schools.

“So, there are three different WhatsApp groups. One is in Year 3, the boys are in Form 1 and 2.

“The internet (data) is insufficient and I need to pay more for top-ups, the access is unstable, some days are slow, depending on the weather,” she said when met by MalaysiaGazette at Kampung Orang Asli Pangsun.

Siti Nur Khatijah, the eldest among the four siblings said that she monitors Muhammad Jumaidi Omer Faruk (14), Juil (13) and Nur Rara Caiser (9) in their studies when their parents are out, seeking income for the family.

As the eldest sister, she said that she has the responsibility in ensuring that her siblings complete the exercises and home work given by the their teachers.

“They miss going to school. They said that they can’t focus learning online as many friends would come to the house, inviting them to play,” she said.

Azmizan Atek, 15, an Orang Asli from the Temuan Tribe at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor. PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.
Azmizan Atek, 15, an Orang Asli from the Temuan Tribe at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor.
PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.

Meanwhile, according to Azmizan Atek, 15, the internet access is vital during the PdPR as he needs to access YouTube, however, the internet access in the area is dissatisfactory.

The Form Three student from Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan (SMK) Abdul Jalil said that the frequent internet connection problem makes him miss going to school as usual and learn face-to-face from his teachers.

“The Internet problem… sometimes, it’s slow, sometimes, it’s okay.

“I usually use my mother or my father’s phone because my elder sister is also using her phone to study online,” he said.

For Murni Kassim, 31, the excessively slow internet access makes things difficult for her niece, Nur Amanda Amani, 9, to follow PdPR.

An Orang Asli from the Temuan tribe, Murni Kassim speaking to MalaysiaGazette about the home based teaching and learning (PdPR) at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor. PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.
An Orang Asli from the Temuan tribe, Murni Kassim speaking to MalaysiaGazette about the home based teaching and learning (PdPR) at Kampung Pangsun, Hulu Langat, Selangor.
PIX: SYAFIQ AMBAK / MalaysiaGazette / 25 JANUARY 2021.

Murni, who is also an Orang Asli from the Temuan tribe and lives in Kampung Melut, Sepang returned to her family home in Kampung Orang Asli Pangsun since the Movement Control Order (MCO) 2.0.

“All parents go to SMK Abdul Jalil to get their text books today, so, I stay at home to monitor my niece and my eight-year-old in their PdPR.

“We face internet problem. When we open Youtube, the video lags. When the teacher is talking, the telephone screen hangs.

“It is just a week after the school reopens and there is nothing much that they can learn,” she said. –MalaysiaGazette

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